Campfire Safety


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Campfire Safety Tips

  • Build campfires away from overhanging branches, steep slopes, rotten stumps, logs, dry grass, and leaves. Pile any extra wood away from the fire.
  • Keep plenty of water handy and have a shovel for throwing dirt on the fire if it gets out of control.
  • Start with dry twigs and small sticks. Add larger sticks as the fire builds up. Put the largest pieces of wood on last, pointing them toward the center of the fire, and gradually push them into the flames.
  • Keep the campfire small. A good bed of coals or a small fire surrounded by rocks give plenty of heat. Scrape away litter, duff and any burnable material within a 10-foot diameter circle. This will keep a small campfire from spreading.
  • Be sure your match is out. Hold it until it is cold. Break it so you can feel the charred portion before discarding it.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended. Even a small breeze could quickly cause the fire to spread.
  • Drown the fire with water. Make sure all embers, coals and sticks are wet. Move rocks, there may be burning embers underneath.
  • Stir the remains, add more water, and stir again. Be sure all burned material has been extinguished and cooled. If you do not have water, use dirt. Mix enough soil and sand with the embers. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cooled.
  • Feel all materials with your bare hand. Make sure that no roots are burning. Do not bury your coals-- they can smolder and break out.

USDA Forest Service


Building a Safe Campfire



Putting Out Your Campfire


Campfire Safety

  • Build campfires where they will not spread, away from dry grass and leaves.
  • Keep campfires small, and don't let them get out of hand.
  • Keep plenty of water and a shovel around to douse the fire when you're done. Stir it and douse it again with water.
  • Never leave campfires unattended.

U.S. Fire Administration       usfa.dhs.gov



Legit Kit:  Outdoor Gear


Campfire Safety

The traditional end to a camping day is a campfire. Following simple fire safety rules can prevent a smoldering ember from becoming a wildfire. Sixty-plus years after his creation by USDA Forest Service, National Association of State Foresters, and the Ad Council, Smokey [the] Bear still offers simple wildfire prevention rules:

  • Dig a small pit away from overhanging branches. (Most parks have campfire pits ready and waiting for you.)
  • Circle the pit with rocks or be sure it already has a metal fire ring.
  • Clear a five-foot area around the pit down to the soil.
  • Keep a bucket of water and a shovel nearby.
  • Stack extra wood upwind and away from the fire.
  • After lighting, do not discard the match until it is cold.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended, not even for a minute.

CDC.GOV

Fireworks Safety

  • The best way to enjoy fireworks is to visit public fireworks displays put on by professionals who know how to safely handle fireworks.
  • If you plan to use fireworks, make sure they are legal in your area.
  • Never light fireworks indoors or near dry grass.
  • Always have a bucket of water and/or a fire extinguisher nearby. Know how to operate the fire extinguisher properly.
  • Do not wear loose clothing while using fireworks.
  • Stand several feet away from lit fireworks. If a devise does not go off, do not stand over it to investigate it. Put it out with water and dispose of it.
  • Always read the directions and warning labels on fireworks. If a devise is not marked with the contents, direction and a warning label, do not light it.
  • Supervise children around fireworks at all times.

U.S. Fire Administration       usfa.dhs.gov





Barbecue Safety

  • Before using a grill, check the connection between the propane tank and the fuel line. Make sure the venturi tubes - where the air and gas mix - are not blocked.
  • Do not overfill the propane tank.
  • Do not wear loose clothing while cooking at a barbecue.
  • Be careful when using lighter fluid. Do not add fluid to an already lit fire because the flame can flashback up into the container and explode.
  • Keep all matches and lighters away from children. Teach your children to report any loose matches or lighters to an adult immediately. Supervise children around outdoor grills.
  • Dispose of hot coals properly - douse them with plenty of water, and stir them to ensure that the fire is out. Never place them in plastic, paper or wooden containers.
  • Never grill/barbecue in enclosed areas - carbon monoxide could be produced.
  • Make sure everyone knows to Stop, Drop and Roll in case a piece of clothing does catch fire. Call 911 or your local emergency number if a burn warrants serious medical attention.

U.S. Fire Administration       usfa.dhs.gov



Legit Kit:  Outdoor Gear